Mar 19 2014

Operating room whiteboards help fight infection

Sometimes the best solutions are right before our eyes

Since the 1960s it has been known that certain procedures — such as hysterectomies and colorectal operations — run a high risk for infections, and that if surgeons use prophylactic antibiotics during these surgeries, infection can be avoided.

Now, the Health System hospitals operating rooms are using electronic whiteboards to inform OR medical staff of each patient’s antibiotic needs.

“We had already put up these giant screens in the ORs to show the patient’s name and procedure, and it occurred to us that we could put the screens to even greater use by adding the specific antibiotic individual patients should receive based on the procedure they are having,” says Mark Pearlman, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and head of the OB/Gyn portion of the project. Read the rest of this entry »

Mar 5 2014

Safety Huddles: Sports tactic makes U-M hospitals safer, more efficient

University of Michigan hospitals are using a classic team tactic—huddles—to make things safer and more efficient for patients and staff.

These huddles are safety huddles—daily morning meetings that prep staff on necessary information, including patient admissions and discharges, problems with equipment, medication changes, support services, supplies and more. They run Monday through Friday, from 8:45 a.m. to 9 a.m.—a brisk 15 minutes—right after bed briefing.

Chris Dickinson, M.D., professor of pediatrics and the co-architect of patient safety huddles, leads a morning huddle to help staff make the hospital safer and more efficient for patients and staff.

Although the safety huddles have never been mandatory, “everybody wants to come,” says Scott Marquette, intermediate project manager at U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital. A typical meeting includes charge nurses, ambulatory care bed managers, laundry managers, support staff, biomed, Office of Clinical Safety and MCIT (Medical Center Information Technology)—in short, everyone with information to give to others and/or a need to know. Marquette sends information gleaned from the huddle to 190 managers and staff across Children’s and Women’s via email. Staff who want to be added to the email list should email Marquette.

“Like all hospitals, we have safety concerns,” says Chris Dickinson, M.D., professor of pediatrics and the architect, with Marquette, of the safety huddles. “To get people thinking about safety, you really have to change your culture. The safety huddles get people thinking about safety all the time. We talk about all sorts of error prevention strategies.” Read the rest of this entry »